Malayan Tiger
Panthera tigris jacksoni

CLASS: Mammalia
ORDER: Carnivora
FAMILY: Felidae

SIZE:
Males average 9 feet in length from head to tail and weigh about 400 lbs.; females are smaller at 8 feet long and 250 lbs.

RANGE:
Classified as a separate subspecies from the Indochinese tiger in 2004, the Malayan tiger is found only in the southern Malay Peninsula within the broadleaf forests of Malaysia and Thailand.

HABITAT:
Remote forests in hilly to mountainous terrain

DIET:
Wild - Wild pigs, wild deer, and wild cattle
Zoo - Feline diet (primarily ground horsemeat)

DESCRIPTION:
Reddish-ochre color with short narrow stripes; smaller than Bengal and Siberian tigers; black dots seen among stripes

FACTS:

  • Generally solitary and extremely territorial.
  • A tiger can see in the dark 6 times better than humans.
  • One of the only cats that like water; good swimmers.

YOUNG:
Typically mate in spring and summer; female bares 2-4 young. Young are nursed for 5 or 6 months; can leave the den when two months old; can hunt alone at 11 months.

STATUS:
The wild population of the Malayan tiger is unknown, but it is estimated at around 500 individuals. CITES App. I; all tiger species are extremely ENDANGERED with some on the brink of extinction. Threats include poaching, illegal trading, habitat and prey loss, and conflict with humans.

REFERENCE:
Grzimek's Animal Life Encyclopedia, Vol. 12, Mammals III, Dr. Bernhard Grzimek
**International Species Information System as of 30 September 2000

NOTE:
6 subspecies of tiger remain: Bengal, Siberian, South China, Sumatran, Indochinese, and Malayan. 3 other subspecies (Bali, Javan, and Caspian) are already extinct.