White-tailed Sea Eagle
Haliaeetus albicilla

CLASS: Aves
ORDER: Falconiformes
FAMILY: Accipitridae

SIZE:
Length 30-37 inches; weight 7-14 pounds; wingspread 80-97 inches.

RANGE:
Central Europe to Siberia, also Greenland and the Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

HABITAT:
This eagle is found in lowlands near both fresh and salt water. Its nests and roosts are found on high cliffs or in tall trees.

DIET:

  • Wild - Fish, birds, eggs, mammals, carrion.
  • Zoo - Fish, chicks, Bird of Prey diet, rats.

DESCRIPTION:
A large brown eagle. The adults have pale buffy head, neck, breast, and wing coverts with a white tail. Juvenile birds are darker brown with a brown tail. Females are larger than males. Juveniles become adult at 6 years of age but do not get a wholly white tail until 8 years old. Adults have yellow eyes, bill, legs, and feet. This eagle is similar to the North American Bald Eagle but has a buffy brown, not white, head.

FACTS:

  • Believed to pair for life.
  • They soar, sky dance, and do aerial displays.
  • The large nest (an aerie) is made of sticks and branches and is reused for many years.

YOUNG:
Lay 1-3 eggs that are incubated for 34-46 days. The young fledge in 70-90 days and become independent 35 days later.

STATUS:
Vulnerable; Cites I.

REFERENCES:

  • Raptors of the World. James Ferguson-Lees & David A. Christie.
  • Handbook of the Birds of the World. Vol. 2. New World Vultures to Guineafowl. Josep del Hoyo, Andrew Elliott, and Jordie Sargatal.